I was recently asked to do a new interview, this one for William Ramsay Investigates‘ You-Tube channel and the Ed Opperman Report radio network.

This is the You Tube video upload on William Ramsay’s main channel. The audio/radio version should be airing on Awake radio at 22.00 tomorrow (Saturday 4th February) and then otherwise available on all channels of the Ed Opperman Report. Read the rest of this entry »

Seriously? A ‘Day of Rage’?
The problem I have with this protest in London is two-fold. The first is wanting to ‘bring down the government’ (according to the event page on Facebook), which is totally wrongheaded.

And I say this as someone who generally supports Jeremy Corbyn.

The second reason is much more ominous to me – and is to do with language, branding and connotations. I’ll get to that in a moment.

Anyone who reads this blog often enough knows that I’m not defending Theresa May’s government. And most of the reasons people are angry with the government and protesting against it are reasons I entirely agree with. Read the rest of this entry »

In regard to the Finsbury Park attack on Monday, a lot of talk has resurfaced regarding recurring fears of ‘civil war’ type scenarios in the not-distant future or a ‘race war’ type of situation: one that might not just threaten England, but occur elsewhere too, like in France or the United States.

I want to explore that subject here: and particularly how the key players on both sides of the extremist divide are being cleverly used to try to plunge our societies into sectarian turmoil.

In doing so, we need to look at, among other things, the funding for the highly influential ‘Islamophobia Network’, the overt hijacking of alternative media by very devious psy-op merchants, and the nature and danger of the Far-Right movement and its new, modern figureheads and techniques.

After most terror attacks or false-flag ops, I’ve talked about the divide-and-conquer programme or ‘strategy of tension’ designed to play off different parts of society against each other – and this is a big part of where that programme appears to be heading.  Read the rest of this entry »

A quick post here on the Finsbury Park attack – because what I actually want to talk about more is the so-called ‘race war’ meme or the widespread predictions/fears of a ‘civil war’ type scenario on the streets of England, as well as France, the US and elsewhere.

That, however, is such a big, important and complex subject, that I just want to talk quickly and solely about Finsbury Park first – and I will publish that bigger, broader article tomorrow.

As with the June 3rd attack in London Bridge, I was listening to a couple of hours of live radio as the story was breaking. As I have a habit of leaving the radio on when I’m trying to fall asleep, I happened to hear a number of live eyewitness callers from Finsbury Park – and it is clear that this was a real incident, just as London Bridge was probably a real incident. Read the rest of this entry »

This is probably being a little tongue in cheek; and it probably isn’t the most serious or important story in the news right now.

But it bothered me enough to want to say something about it. Specifically about Liberal Democrats leader, Tim Farron, resigning. The reason he has specifically given for having done so is the pressure and criticism he has received lately on account of his Christian beliefs. Read the rest of this entry »


A lot of conspiracy theories have been floating around online about the tragic Grenfell Tower fire: I’m not really buying any of them. This horrible, terrible event looks less like ‘conspiracy’ and more a simpler case of mismanagement, apathy and criminal negligence.  

However, this article by Joseph Downing (Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS)) for The Conversation is one of the better pieces I’ve seen in response to the Grenfell travesty.  

It is republished here in full – with permission.  Read the rest of this entry »

As reported by RT, hundreds of people took to the streets in Ghat, on Saturday night, to celebrate the release of Saif Gaddafi after several years of detention.

The footage shows honking cars driving through the streets. Other Gaddafi supporters were seen waving the green flags of the ‘Great Socialist People’s Libyan Arab Jamahiriya’, as has been seen frequently in parts of Libya since the fall of the state in 2011.

The unverified stories of Saif having been released had been going on for some time already; I covered it here last September, but noted it was odd that major media outlets weren’t covering it. Given this disparity between earlier claims, lack of media coverage at the time and the broader media coverage now, it is difficult to know whether Saif Gaddafi was freed last year or whether it has just happened in recent weeks. Read the rest of this entry »

It is not all that often that something happens that seems to conveniently bring together so many of the different subjects I’ve been talking about recently.

In this case, concerning Theresa May and the DUP, this article manages to string together multiple subjects I’ve been posting about previously, including false-flag terrorism, MI5 and state collusion with terrorist activity, the ‘Secret Courts’ that Britain introduced in 2013 (which was alluded to in the Police State piece), and even the creeping rise of international fascist networks that I covered at great length in an article called ‘Seeds of Fascism‘.

The immediate fall-out from the June 8th election has actually brought all of these subjects into one extraordinary ‘tag cloud’ that I hadn’t anticipated – and which I will try to explain here. Read the rest of this entry »

And, if there was any doubt, Theresa May herself confirmed it in recent days.
Forget about ‘Brexit’ – this election has much more at stake than that. If anyone is thinking of not voting at all – please think again.

All of the pieces have been carefully moved into place over several years – and Theresa May has been at the heart of all of it.

One of the most important of these was the introduction of ‘Secret Courts’ (under the ‘Justice and Security’ legislation) under the Tory government in 2013. Another was the Investigatory Powers Bill (Snoopers Charter): the mass surveillance programme that Mrs May was trying to introduce for years and finally did in January this year.

Another is the Draconian law being proposed to deal with whistleblowers and journalists and their criminalisation.

And now we have Mrs May openly saying she needs to push aside human rights laws in order to combat terrorism. Read the rest of this entry »

In the main post earlier, I alluded to video footage that I wanted to share – and which I said probably undermines the entire narrative regarding the June 3rd attack.

Well, here it is.

In truth, with further consideration, it probably doesn’t fully destroy the entire narrative; but it does raise serious questions. Read the rest of this entry »