So this feels really weird now.
After Chris Cornell’s death back in May, I wrote one immediate article on the subject and then I consciously chose not to write anything more.

This was for the same reason that I chose not to get drawn into all the conspiracy theories and predictable ‘Illuminati ritual murder’ videos springing up on You Tube – I was too upset by the death of one of my genuine heroes and I didn’t want to complicate or infect my feelings any further by opening myself up to all those other things.

It’s much easier to take an objective, dispassionate overview of subjects or cases like this when you’re not emotionally invested in the individual person: but when it concerns someone you really care about or have a strong sense of connection to in your psyche, it is more difficult to stomach all the rabid theories and speculations or to assess the ‘evidence’ at all.

I still feel that way; and I am generally wary of the plethora of Illuminati-centered conspiracy theories/videos that immediately spring up every time anyone vaguely famous dies.

In some cases, there are genuine reasons a death needs to be looked at more closely, but in many cases it’s just people who dive blindly onto the conspiracy bandwagon for either click-bait or just ingrained (unhealthy) reflex.

I’m not someone who thinks every death is a conspiracy; and I still probably don’t think Chris Cornell was murdered. But the last couple of days have re-awoken niggling uncertainties.  Read the rest of this entry »

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I noted a few days ago the similarities between the late Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh and the late Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi.

We noted that the unsettling footage circulating on the Internet and some news channels of his death were eerily reminiscent of the brutal murder of Gaddafi in October 2011.

And we also noted that Saleh (pictured above with two other casualties of the Arab Spring, Gaddafi and Mubarak) had other similarities to Gaddafi in terms of his decades-long rule, his carefully nurtured relationships with the Yemeni tribes and factions that allowed him to keep order and stability in the country for so long, and how he – like Gaddafi – fell victim to the ‘Arab Spring’.

Something else Saleh had in common with Gaddafi had been a belief in the ideas of pan-Arabism and a particular admiration of President Nasser in Egypt, who, as it happens, was also a major inspiration for Gaddafi. Read the rest of this entry »

Jerusalem is regarded as an international city, under a world body protectorate.

That is its prevailing status.

The United Nations has affirmed in a number of resolutions that continued Zionist colonisation of Jerusalem is illegal under international law. Every Zionist settlement in illegally occupied East Jerusalem is a direct contravention of the Fourth Geneva Convention, which forbids an occupying power from transferring colonists into the areas it occupies.

The UN Partition Plan in 1947 – which divided Palestine between Jewish and Arab states – was clear to grant Jerusalem special status, placing it under international sovereignty and control. To some, this situation isn’t ideal – but to most, it’s the situation that works.

This special status was based on the historic city’s cultural and religious importance to Muslims, Christians and Jews, meaning that no one party should have control over it. Jerusalem houses some of the most important buildings or locations in all three religions and has always been a melting pot of all three – and other – communities. Read the rest of this entry »

It is baffling that ‘Russia-Gate’ is still going on – much less that so many platforms or agencies seem to be taking it so seriously.

It is clear to most discerning minds that the entire ‘Russia-gate’ fiasco that is utterly dominating politics and media in the United States is an exaggerated or fabricated pantomime, designed to discredit or hamstring Donald Trump‘s presidency and – moreover – to provide a phony ‘excuse’ for why Hillary Clinton lost the 2016 election.

Having needed something to blame for the horror/humiliation of having lost the presidential election to a complete moron, the Clinton camp and its supporters decided to blame Russia for ‘hacking’ the election (which, in fact, seems to mean nothing more than running a propaganda campaign contrary to the American MSM propaganda). Read the rest of this entry »

The murder of former Yemen president Ali Abdullah Saleh by Houthi rebels will simply guarantee continued and intensified attacks by the Saudi-led coalition that has been bombing Yemen since March 2015.

By Sunday, Houthi fighters had taken control of most of the capital, Sanaa, with intense battles going on in the city.

Saudi airstrikes didn’t prvent the Houthi fighters from reaching former President Saleh’s own home on Monday. Shortly after this, the reports began to circulate that he had been murdered, with some versions of the story claiming he had been taken out of the vehicle he had attempted to flee in and summarily executed by Houthi fighers acting no better than Al-Qaeda fighters or jihadists. Read the rest of this entry »

The situation in Libya has largely – and probably by design – fallen off the radar of most mainstrean news or journalism.

Ever since the fall of the Gaddafi government in 2011 – up to which point the mass international media focus had been intense – most media outlets have opted, strategically, to shed as little light as possible on the chaos in the North African nation. Read the rest of this entry »

It’s difficult to tell – particularly for someone like me, who isn’t particularly well versed in the Zimbabwe situation.

That being said, judging by the reactions of journalists and outlets who are much better versed in Zimbabwe, no one really knows if the military intervention in Zimbabwe should be seen as a good thing or a bad thing.

Even ‘experts’ on the country seem undecided or even ambivalent; some being please Mugabe is finished, others not convinced this apparent change is going to lead to any real improvements.

What is interesting to note, however, is the explanation given for the military’s actions. Zimbabwe’s army chief, General Constantino Chiwenga, has said that Robert Mugabe‘s Zanu PF had been infiltrated by ‘counter-revolutionaries’ and that “drastic action” was needed immediately. Read the rest of this entry »

It’s a story that seemed to suddenly blow up out of nowhere. And it resulted in Pritti Patel being called back from Nairobi to meet with the Prime Minister – after which she immediately resigned from office.

The reason, we are told, was a breach of protocol – Patel had failed to inform the appropriate government departments of unofficial meetings she had had with various Israeli officials.

But two different narratives emerged immediately. Read the rest of this entry »

Official British events to mark the centennary of the Balfour Declaration could be seen as questionable, to say the least.

Theresa May’s commitment to the commemorations were promised to Benjamin Netanyahu some time ago – regardless of the fact that the it will leave a bitter taste in the mouths of many or that we’re talking about one of the most divisive documents in modern history.

Both the critics and supporters of Israel are guilty of propagating historical illiteracy about the origins and meaning of Zionism.

Some anti-Israel activists see Zionism in super-simplistic terms as a source of all evil or as a Nazi-style ideaology, while its defenders demonise or shut down anyone – Jewish or non-Jewish – who raises any questions.

The reality and the real history isn’t anything like as simple as either of those positions – real history never is. Read the rest of this entry »

So, a few quick notes on the apparent terror attack/incident in New York.

As usual, this entirely could’ve been a straight-up ISIS-inspired, low-tech, ‘lone wolf’ attack.

And, as usual, maybe not. Read the rest of this entry »