In the article on the Charlottesville unrest and the broader issues of sectarian rifts and societal breakdown, I wrote about the possible psy-op properties and divide-and-conquer strategy being applied.
I also wrote that ‘our hope should be that the majority of people are more intelligent and discerning than that and will refuse to get drawn into the psy-op.’

That is to say I hope that most intelligent people are too discerning to be duped into de-evolving or into being forced into the societal equivalent of an ancient gladiatorial arena.

However, the bigger danger – and this is what I fear – is that things might eventually get so bad, so toxic, that even the most intelligent people (and even those who get that it’s all manipulation) will have no choice but to become part of it (taking one side or another). Read the rest of this entry »


Just when you thought the massive, endless distraction/pantomime of Planet Trump couldn’t get any sillier, the President ditches his Secretary of State Rex Tillerson: and is replacing him with who? Oh, just the head of the CIA.

What’s even dumber is that, given all of the mainstream media hysteria over alleged Trump ‘collusion’ with Russia, the President chose to announce Tillerson’s redundancy right after Tillerson had publicly criticised Russia for its alleged involvement in the nerve-agent incident in Salisbury. Read the rest of this entry »

In the sixth Star Trek  film, The Undiscovered Country, Ambassador Spock tells Captain Kirk, “There’s an old Vulcan saying – only Nixon could go to China.”

The line was supposed to be tongue-in-cheek, suggesting that Nixon going to China was so symbolically significant that it had even become a saying among an alien race centuries in the future.

The Nixon-going-to-China reference has also been cited a bunch of times in recent days, since it has been announced that Donald Trump appears to have accepted North Korea’s invitation for the US President to attend a talk with Kim Jong-un. The seemingly sudden onset of diplomacy and de-escalation seems to have caught most commentators off-guard.

It seems, on the surface, to be a positive development, with the historic meeting tentatively scheduled for May. Read the rest of this entry »

And it is a pretty big rabbit-hole – based entirely on the location where this incident is said to have happened.

Which we will get to in a moment; and then you can decide for yourselves how relevant you think it is or isn’t. But first, let’s just do the basics.

In another month, I would’ve assumed or accepted that the poisoning of former Russian spy Sergei Skripal was – as we’re being told – a hit by Russian intelligence operatives.

My own personal opinion is still – and I know that this puts me at odds with most conspiracy theory writers – that Alexander Litvenenko was assassinated by Russian agents via pollonium poisoning. Most of what I’ve read over the years (from various sources) makes me inclined to lean towards that explanation. Read the rest of this entry »

Following, somewhat fortuitously from an article here a few weeks ago on protest music, I’ve had the opportunity to interview self-identified Protest Singer, Sam Draisey, to talk about music as protest, the difficulties of trying to make it as a musician, and about the general state of DIY music in the UK.

Sam, from Wolverhampton, has gained a big profile as a folk singer and especially as a live performer, also with three albums under his belt and a continuous array of performances drawing media attention. He tracks much of his experience on a blog here, which is a real gigging performer’s blog. His new album, As I Live and Breathe, is also available now. Read the rest of this entry »

This could actually be viewed as a follow-up to the post from a couple of weeks back on the Pentagon‘s ‘Nuclear Posture Review’ and the threat of another Hiroshima-like event in our lifetimes.

In that instance, I was highlighting the insanity of what the NPR proposed and noting the very worrying change in language concerning nuclear weapons.

A lot of attention has been paid to Vladimir Putin’s state of the nation address on Wednesday, which has been construed by most Western media as having been overtly threatening. In part of the speech, Putin announced the existence of Russia’s new, expanded nuclear weapons and capabilities, suggesting that Russia now has superior nuclear capabilities to the United States and NATO and is perfectly capable of handling any attack against it. Read the rest of this entry »

I haven’t seen the Black Panther movie yet; but I’m looking forward to it.

T’Challa, the Black Panther, has for a long time been one of my absolute favorite comic book characters – and I’ve been glad that his mythology has been given the cinema treatment: and that it appears to be doing so well and generating so much conversation.

But, amid all of that conversation (much of which, rightly, is focused on the subject of the first entirely black superhero movie), one thing that probably won’t be discussed is the subject I’m going to cover here now: which gives me a rare opportunity to talk about both my love of comic-book mythologies and my interest in real-world geo-political conspiracies at the same time.

This isn’t an article about the film or even about the character’s history. Rather, it’s about a specific perception I have of the Black Panther mythology and how it relates to particular real-life North-African nation that I’ve written a lot about in the past – specifically Libya, and more specifically the Gaddafi-era Libya.

Now, obviously, I’ll need to justify this – and I will. Read the rest of this entry »

When it comes to Syria, you can set your watch for all the different acts in the stage-play that is the mass-media and international coverage.

I referred to Syria previously as ‘Syria the Movie’, in regard especially to the media production company known as the White Helmets. It’s a movie with endless sequels: and the script and structure never changes, the dialogue is all the same.

First up, let’s make an obvious prediction: there’s going to be another staged ‘chemical attack’ very soon – if not in the next few days, then definitely in the next few weeks. Read the rest of this entry »

Do you ever get the feeling that our collective destiny or well-being is in the hands of madmen?

Something very worrying has been suggesting itself for a while now – a notable change in language that I was beginning to notice over the last two years or so: but which has very much come more sharply into focus in recent weeks.

Specifically, I’m referring to the strange way that it suddenly has become acceptable for officials or strategists to talk about nuclear strikes in terms of ‘first use’ or preemptive strikes.

The accepted language or dynamics surrounding nuclear weapons or policy seem to have shifted at some point in the last two years – and it seems like something we should be very concerned about. Unfortunately, mainstream media outlets seem to be entirely uninterested. Read the rest of this entry »

The sudden and untimely death of the Cranberries frontwoman Dolores O’Riordan made for another sad start to another year, with the loss of another great, iconic rock star of the last two decades.

Dolores, who was found deceased on January 15th in a London hotel room, was only 46.

As I noted at the deaths of both Chris Cornell and Scott Weiland, it has felt like many or even most of the best or most important musical voices from my personal favorite era of music have had short lives. Read the rest of this entry »