So this feels really weird now.
After Chris Cornell’s death back in May, I wrote one immediate article on the subject and then I consciously chose not to write anything more.

This was for the same reason that I chose not to get drawn into all the conspiracy theories and predictable ‘Illuminati ritual murder’ videos springing up on You Tube – I was too upset by the death of one of my genuine heroes and I didn’t want to complicate or infect my feelings any further by opening myself up to all those other things.

It’s much easier to take an objective, dispassionate overview of subjects or cases like this when you’re not emotionally invested in the individual person: but when it concerns someone you really care about or have a strong sense of connection to in your psyche, it is more difficult to stomach all the rabid theories and speculations or to assess the ‘evidence’ at all.

I still feel that way; and I am generally wary of the plethora of Illuminati-centered conspiracy theories/videos that immediately spring up every time anyone vaguely famous dies.

In some cases, there are genuine reasons a death needs to be looked at more closely, but in many cases it’s just people who dive blindly onto the conspiracy bandwagon for either click-bait or just ingrained (unhealthy) reflex.

I’m not someone who thinks every death is a conspiracy; and I still probably don’t think Chris Cornell was murdered. But the last couple of days have re-awoken niggling uncertainties.  Read the rest of this entry »

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It’s difficult to tell – particularly for someone like me, who isn’t particularly well versed in the Zimbabwe situation.

That being said, judging by the reactions of journalists and outlets who are much better versed in Zimbabwe, no one really knows if the military intervention in Zimbabwe should be seen as a good thing or a bad thing.

Even ‘experts’ on the country seem undecided or even ambivalent; some being please Mugabe is finished, others not convinced this apparent change is going to lead to any real improvements.

What is interesting to note, however, is the explanation given for the military’s actions. Zimbabwe’s army chief, General Constantino Chiwenga, has said that Robert Mugabe‘s Zanu PF had been infiltrated by ‘counter-revolutionaries’ and that “drastic action” was needed immediately. Read the rest of this entry »

It’s a story that seemed to suddenly blow up out of nowhere. And it resulted in Pritti Patel being called back from Nairobi to meet with the Prime Minister – after which she immediately resigned from office.

The reason, we are told, was a breach of protocol – Patel had failed to inform the appropriate government departments of unofficial meetings she had had with various Israeli officials.

But two different narratives emerged immediately. Read the rest of this entry »

Official British events to mark the centennary of the Balfour Declaration could be seen as questionable, to say the least.

Theresa May’s commitment to the commemorations were promised to Benjamin Netanyahu some time ago – regardless of the fact that the it will leave a bitter taste in the mouths of many or that we’re talking about one of the most divisive documents in modern history.

Both the critics and supporters of Israel are guilty of propagating historical illiteracy about the origins and meaning of Zionism.

Some anti-Israel activists see Zionism in super-simplistic terms as a source of all evil or as a Nazi-style ideaology, while its defenders demonise or shut down anyone – Jewish or non-Jewish – who raises any questions.

The reality and the real history isn’t anything like as simple as either of those positions – real history never is. Read the rest of this entry »

So, a few quick notes on the apparent terror attack/incident in New York.

As usual, this entirely could’ve been a straight-up ISIS-inspired, low-tech, ‘lone wolf’ attack.

And, as usual, maybe not. Read the rest of this entry »

The riddle of the Roman ‘ghost legions’ is one of the most fascinating anomalies or urban legends around, particularly in Britain.

As it’s that time of the year, I want to briefly come back into this area – particularly for how the mystery of the spectral legions can also lead us into questions about the nature of time, space, consciousness and reality.

Previously, I posted a piece about ghost stories and traditions from the Roman world. This time, I wanted to focus in on something much more specific: the so-called Phantom Legions. Read the rest of this entry »

Mainstream and online media outlets have been pouring over the release of thousands of documents pertaining to the JFK assassination.

But the result, near as I can tell, appears to be that we’ve learnt a great deal – and nothing at all.

And this was probably how it was meant to be.

Although the files were scheduled for release at this time many years ago, it is curious that – after all the fuss the President made about the files being made public – a large number of additional files were withheld.

The implication is that these had to be withheld due to the compromisng effect they might have on people who are still alive. Given some very high-profile figures who are still alive, still very powerful and who have long been linked to the Kennedy assassination (including former presidents and secretaries of defense) this is perhaps understandable.

But, that being the case, this then becomes a pointless PR exercise – if you’re not going to release everything, then there’s no point in releasing anything. Read the rest of this entry »

I’ve been pondering this for some time; and have tried to somewhat lay out the subject as best as I can here in this article.

This is something of a thought-experiment; trying to track the various strands of consequences from a single event, but moreover, trying to understand why that event has everything to do with where we are now – and on multiple levels – in this first decade-and-a-half of the twenty-first century.

With all the bad things and negative situations going on in the world today, why have things come to this? How could most of this stuff – in the Middle East, in Europe, even in the US – have been avoided?

Could it have been avoided? Read the rest of this entry »

As expected and predicted, the danger of further conflict in both Iraq and the Middle East has become apparent again – this time centering on the issue of the Kurdish situation in Iraq.

In effect, it looks like the seeds for the next problem were already bearing fruit behind the surface of the ‘ISIS’ conflict.

Before the dust has even settled from the ongoing conflict with the so-called ‘Islamic State’, more conflict is already being generated. It’s like an endless conflict that keeps mutating and re-arranging itself so that it can continue in some new form or another: as if the ‘conflict’ itself is a living entity that keeps regenerating in some new configuration so that it always lives on. Read the rest of this entry »

Tense, divisive or controversial ‘referendums’ seem to be the in-thing right now.
Presently, a lot of coverage has been given to two independence referendums in different parts of the globe: one in Spain and one in Iraq.

Both referendums also have things in common.

Regarding the Catalonian independence referendum in Spain, I have no personal views on whether Catalonian independence is a good idea or not.

However, the apparent extent of the Spannish government’s attemps to derail, discourage or vilify the vote has reinforced my original suspicions some weeks ago that the apparent Barcelona terrorist attack (vehicle attack) wasn’t what it appeared to be – and may in fact have been a Deep State or Gladio style operation to intimidate Catalonians ahead of the vote and also to provide a pretext for sending armed military or police into the region ahead of the impending vote. Read the rest of this entry »