Archive for the ‘(All Things) CULTURE’ Category

I hadn’t initially given much thought to the vehicle/terror attack/massacre in Barcelona; aside from it basically feeling like ‘business as usual’ for Europe in this terror-dominated spell of the twenty-first century.

And also aside from thinking that the attack in Barcelona happened at the right time to try to divert some of the attention from what happened in Charlottesville (and take attention away from Nazi flag-wavers and back onto the Islamist problem).

Admittedly, that’s probably just over-thinking on my part.

However, it was someone from Barcelona who prompted me to pay more notice. He sent me a message to remind me that Spain is poised for an ‘existential crisis’ right now, with the Catalonia Independence Referendum due in October.

His theory (as told to me) is that the government (with its friends in NATO) is looking for a reason to militarise its presence in Catalonia in anticipation for that referendum and any possible fall-out. (more…)

It’s fair to say that what unfolded in Charlottesville, Virginia, on Saturday is the kind of thing that has been expected for some time now.
The ongoing inflamation of identity politics and provocation of divide-and-conquer or ‘strategy of tension’ conditioning has been paving the way for incidents like this one; with more probably to come.

What has been building – and has been amplified (deliberately or otherwise) by last year’s toxic presidential election – for some time has been a societal breakdown, racial tension and an atmosphere of totally toxic ideological conflict.

It has been inflamed deliberately and carefully by both the mainstream media and elements on the Left (or probably more accurately, elements involved in manipulating aspects of the Far Left) and, more openly and overtly, by the Right and Far-Right (with the so-called ‘Alt Right’ media also carefully stirring things up as much as possible). (more…)

So this feels really weird now.
After Chris Cornell’s death back in May, I wrote one immediate article on the subject and then I consciously chose not to write anything more.

This was for the same reason that I chose not to get drawn into all the conspiracy theories and predictable ‘Illuminati ritual murder’ videos springing up on You Tube – I was too upset by the death of one of my genuine heroes and I didn’t want to complicate or infect my feelings any further by opening myself up to all those other things.

It’s much easier to take an objective, dispassionate overview of subjects or cases like this when you’re not emotionally invested in the individual person: but when it concerns someone you really care about or have a strong sense of connection to in your psyche, it is more difficult to stomach all the rabid theories and speculations or to assess the ‘evidence’ at all.

I still feel that way; and I am generally wary of the plethora of Illuminati-centered conspiracy theories/videos that immediately spring up every time anyone vaguely famous dies.

In some cases, there are genuine reasons a death needs to be looked at more closely, but in many cases it’s just people who dive blindly onto the conspiracy bandwagon for either click-bait or just ingrained (unhealthy) reflex.

I’m not someone who thinks every death is a conspiracy; and I still probably don’t think Chris Cornell was murdered. But the last couple of days have re-awoken niggling uncertainties.  (more…)

A couple of days ago marked the one-year anniversary of the failed coup attempt in Turkey.
This event has been substantially commemorated in Turkey in recent days; although, even now, it really isn’t clear precisely what happened a year ago.

Some still think the ‘coup’ attempt was staged by the government as a means for Erdogan to consolidate power and begin purges across national institutions. Others still think it was a failed CIA-backed plot, involving ‘Gulenist’ agents, and aimed at overthrowing Erdogan and his party. (more…)

Rita Hayworth is still one of the most iconic pop culture figures of the 20th century and one of the four or five most iconic ‘Hollywood’ stars of the last century.
A few weeks ago marked the thirtieth anniversary of her death in 1987, and I wanted to take a moment to draw attention to some of the curious things relating to Hayworth and also to generally reflect on her.

Her story is an extraordinary, though not particularly happy, one; one that straddles the ‘Golden Age’ of Hollywood and cinema, the Second World War, and even becomes a real-life story of a princess, is punctuated by high-profile marriages and dysfunctions, and eventually finishes as a sad story of early onset Alzheimer’s.

The fact that Hayworth developed Alzheimer’s very young – and a time when the illness wasn’t very well understood – is the saddest aspect of her story. For much of her final years, it is said she didn’t really even know what being ‘Rita Hayworth’ meant and didn’t fully even remember her past.

My own fascination with Rita Hayworth began not with any of her films, but with a feature-length documentary film about her life I remember seeing on TV a number of years ago. It was narrated by Kim Basinger and called simply Rita – The Biography of Rita Hayworth; I remember being entranced by it when it was on in the very late hours of Christmas Day (or early hours of Boxing Day) about twelve years ago. (more…)

Widely published ‘reports’ in the last week or so claimed that the so-called ‘Islamic State’ group’s elusive ‘caliph’, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, had been killed in a Russian airstrike in Raqqa.

In fact, the reports are now that this story was false – which makes me wonder why it was doing the rounds at all. Baghdadi has in fact been declared ‘killed’ a number of times in the last couple of years. I’ve never believed those claims – because I’ve never been properly convinced that ‘Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi’ exists at all.

In covering this subject of Baghdadi here, I’m going to revisit some of what I’ve written here before – specifically regarding the Baghdadi mystery, but also the older Bin Laden myth (as I believe the two are related), and the whole business of this ‘caliphate’ that the ‘ISIS/Daesh’ group has been trying to carve out in the Middle East. (more…)

Seriously? A ‘Day of Rage’?
The problem I have with this protest in London is two-fold. The first is wanting to ‘bring down the government’ (according to the event page on Facebook), which is totally wrongheaded.

And I say this as someone who generally supports Jeremy Corbyn.

The second reason is much more ominous to me – and is to do with language, branding and connotations. I’ll get to that in a moment.

Anyone who reads this blog often enough knows that I’m not defending Theresa May’s government. And most of the reasons people are angry with the government and protesting against it are reasons I entirely agree with. (more…)

In regard to the Finsbury Park attack on Monday, a lot of talk has resurfaced regarding recurring fears of ‘civil war’ type scenarios in the not-distant future or a ‘race war’ type of situation: one that might not just threaten England, but occur elsewhere too, like in France or the United States.

I want to explore that subject here: and particularly how the key players on both sides of the extremist divide are being cleverly used to try to plunge our societies into sectarian turmoil.

In doing so, we need to look at, among other things, the funding for the highly influential ‘Islamophobia Network’, the overt hijacking of alternative media by very devious psy-op merchants, and the nature and danger of the Far-Right movement and its new, modern figureheads and techniques.

After most terror attacks or false-flag ops, I’ve talked about the divide-and-conquer programme or ‘strategy of tension’ designed to play off different parts of society against each other – and this is a big part of where that programme appears to be heading.  (more…)

A quick post here on the Finsbury Park attack – because what I actually want to talk about more is the so-called ‘race war’ meme or the widespread predictions/fears of a ‘civil war’ type scenario on the streets of England, as well as France, the US and elsewhere.

That, however, is such a big, important and complex subject, that I just want to talk quickly and solely about Finsbury Park first – and I will publish that bigger, broader article tomorrow.

As with the June 3rd attack in London Bridge, I was listening to a couple of hours of live radio as the story was breaking. As I have a habit of leaving the radio on when I’m trying to fall asleep, I happened to hear a number of live eyewitness callers from Finsbury Park – and it is clear that this was a real incident, just as London Bridge was probably a real incident. (more…)