So the shooting/attack in Strasborg at the Christmas Market.

It doesn’t really need much thinking to go into this, but I’m giving it a go partly for Mark from Truthscoop: because he pointed out that hardly anyone appears to have spoken about this particular ‘act of terror’ in any sceptical terms.

He’s right: but I’ve noted this before too (in regard to the Westminster ‘attack’ a few months ago, which seemed to barely register a blip in the news cycle or even in online alt-media and which most of us have completely forgotten about) – people who used to be all over this stuff a few years ago no longer seem to care.

I suspect this is partly because a lot of those people have shifted their interest from Objective Observation to instead joining in the divide-and-conquer programme itself, taking their lead from the mass hijacking of ‘alternative media’ that calls itself the ‘alt right’. For them, supposed Islamist-related terror attacks are best left unrefuted – because it serves the interests of the Alt-Right brainwashing programme and the divide-and-conquer psy-op.

That’s why – at the higher end of that equation – people like Alex Jones and Paul Joseph Watson no longer acknowledge the existence of false-flag operations: and this is why a majority of self-styled ‘truther’ bloggers or video-makers also do the same, because they take their lead from the big ‘influencers’ in the hijacked ‘alternative media. Read the rest of this entry »

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I’ve been a little late focusing on the ‘Yellow Vest’ protests or strikes in France.

But it seems to me, given a cursory reading of various sources, like a legitimate, mass expression of dissatisfaction with the French establishment politicians. A lot of people in France are fed up and have decided to group together to make their discontent heard.

There have been conspiracy theories flying all over the place (aren’t there always?): ranging from the protests being led by Le Pen supporting fascists to a theory that it’s a Color Revolution being orchestrated by Trump and the US to unseat Macron or a Russian-influenced movement to further destabilise the West.

None of the ‘theories’ or unnecessary add-ons to the narrative that I’ve seen are convincing.

And there’s one particular strand of Deliberate Misinformation that is particularly sinister – which I’ll focus on shortly.

Because, as much as this is an article about the Yellow Vest protests, it is also an article about the sinister information war – which weaves through all of the idealogical divide, ‘culture war’ and socio-political crisis occuring in Western nations.

My purpose here is not to question the French protesters, but to debunk the lies of the people who are deliberately misrepresenting the protests.

From what I can tell, it looks like the Yellow Vest protests are just people in France being genuinely fed up. There are probably elements in there who inserted themselves into the situation just to cause trouble or create violence – but that’s always what happens. In reality, it seems simply that a lot of ordinary, dissatisfied people in France have had enough of taking the hit for elite 1% interests: and that a protest like this has been building for a long time.

So, to be clear, nothing in this article is calling into question the motives or intentions of the actual French protesters themselves – who seem to be in solidarity with each other and against the corrupt, elite interests dominating France.

However (and unfortunately, perhaps), ever since the ‘Arab Spring’, I do get suspicious of sudden eruptions of mass protests that come packaged with a symbol or slogan. Read the rest of this entry »

The rise of Jair Bolsonaro in Brazil seems to be further proof that pretty much the entire planet is moving in a counter-clockwise direction.

Almost everywhere you look, there seems to be the sense that the Bad Guys are in the ascendancy: and that – far from opposing it – very large sections of populations are almost gleeful about welcoming that state of affairs.

I wrote at length here a few weeks ago about all of the madness, misinformation and *reality* of the ‘Migrant Caravan’ from Honduras to the US: and that’s going to be relevant again to this subject of what’s going on in Brazil.

We really have entered into an extraordinary age of mass manipulation, popular stupidity, blind folly and open conspiracy.

‘Corruption’ is a massive factor too, of course: but corruption is the oldest profession in the world, so we should always take that as a given. There’s always a big dose of cognitive dissonance going on when people talk about all the ‘corruption’ and the need to find a saviour to ‘fix’ all the terrible ‘corruption’ – that’s also one of the oldest tricks/archetypes in the book.

‘Corruption’ and dealing with all these ‘corrupt politicians’ is actually precisely the thing that paved the way to this state of affairs – which we’ll come to in a moment, as we’ll have to rewind the narrative back two years.

But what also keeps occuring to me is the sense that the Old Elites are playing an absolute blinder: casting themselves and their proxies as the heroes in the shifting equations, often manipulating even the working classes into championing them and generally getting people to mostly miss the forest for the trees. Read the rest of this entry »

Amid all the recent provocation and manuevering concerning Russia, Ukraine and the Azov Sea (see here and here), another story may have passed under a lot of peoples’ radars: concerning not the Azov Sea, but Ukraine’s Neo-Nazi ‘Azov Batallion’.

It’s arguably not a huge story in itself: and I’ll get to it in a moment.

But I want to explore how I think this story relates to so much else of what I’ve been talking about here for a few years now: including the war on Russia, the Islamists and the destablisation of the Middle East, the projected ‘race wars’ or societal breakdown, the rise of the Far-Right and white supremacists, and the possible or probable fascist conspiracy manuevering behind all of this.

You often find, when you’ve been keeping tabs on various different situations or themes for a few years, that they tend to come together and inter-relate more often than you’d think – indicating that even things that appear to be unconnected on the surface actually weave together as part of a dangerous web.

This would be either by deliberate design or by unforeseen consequences and the dominoe effect. Read the rest of this entry »

It can be dangerous to be an activist for the environment or even for human rights: particularly in a country where foreign-trained Death Squads are working directly for the corporations whose interests you’re interfering with.

I covered the murder Honduran activist Beta Caceres here in 2016.

I covered the Honduras coup in that article too: and revisited it recently again here in relation to the current Migrant Caravan from Honduras to the US/Mexico border.

The short recap is that the US State Department in 2009 provided cover for a right-wing military coup in Honduras that overthrew the elected government and has been in power ever since: engaging in mass suppression, state violence and general dictatorship. Read the rest of this entry »

The burning up of so much of California over a short period of time (in 2017 and now in 2018) has amounted to what has been called the most destructive ‘wildfire’ event in the state’s history.

The scale of the damage has been enormous, as well as the disruption to people’s lives, the loss of homes and property, and what will amount to drastic alterations to infrastructure and demographics.

The raging fires and the destruction left in their wake have also been met with conspiracy theories and accusations of the true nature of the catastrophe being covered up.

I’m not in the habit of always assuming or thinking everything that goes on is a conspiracy with some hidden agenda. I’m still of the school that, sometimes, Shit Just Happens. Certainly, when seemingly natural disasters unfold, I’m not really looking for any kind of hidden truth or cover-up – although, of course, sometimes some ‘natural disasters’ probably aren’t as natural as they first appear.

In the case of the California fires, I saw a lot of conspiracy theories coming up on my radar from when the fires were raging last year. I was ignoring most of it at first (it didn’t help that several of the sources I was being recommended were self-declared flat-earthers: which is never a good start). But the more I started looking through some of the claims (and some of the evidence), the more I started to realise the conspiracy accusations were not misplaced: because they’re not (at least the ones I’ve been convinced by) actually ‘conspiracy theories’ at all, but observations accompanied by questions. Read the rest of this entry »

100 years ago, the First World War was a devastating conflict in which many millions of people lost their lives and in which the political, social and even geographical state of the world was changed forever.
But, far from being the “war to end all wars”, the consequences of World War I are very much still relevant, still being felt today, particularly in regard to the Middle East.

The First World War was, after all, thought of as “the war to end all wars”, but within less than a generation of that apocalyptic conflict came the Second World War, the causes of which were directly traceable to World War I and specifically the terms of the Treaty of Versailles and the treatment of Germany.

World War II then was arguably just a continuation of World War I. And the Cold War that followed World War II was arguably still a result of World War I and the Russian Revolution: in theory, the Cold War continued until the end of the 1980s.

But it’s fascinating to note how much of today’s conflict is rooted also in the events of the First World War.

For example, the situation currently occurring in the Middle East is directly traceable to the events of World War I, albeit via a much longer period of time; the Balfour Declaration, the creation of the modern State of Israel in Palestine, the Sykes-Picot agreement, the creation of the Saudi Kingdom and its continuing influence on the region and on international politics, the Colonial carving up of Iraq, Syria and the Middle East – these, among other things, are all traced back to the events of World War I or its immediate aftermath.

Strictly speaking, of course, the war did end in 1918. But, if you factor in conflicts or scenarios originating in that war and still going on now, then you could argue that the war certainly wasn’t wrapped up with a tidy little bow in 1918.

The argument that World War I never really ended (or, at least, that we’re still living in its enormous shadow) was reinforced by, of all things, the advent of the so-called Islamic State group and the bloody chaos that ripped apart the heart of the Middle East in recent years – with ‘ISIS’ having literally talked about “the end of Sykes-Picot” as part of its ill-conceived ‘manifesto’. Read the rest of this entry »

A statue of the late Soundgarden/Audioslave frontman and rock music legend, Chris Cornell, was recently unveiled in Seattle.

I haven’t been able to figure out how I feel about this monument, or what it’s meant to represent, or for who’s sake it has been erected.

My instinctive reaction to the images of it are that it seems like a tacky thing to do: and also seems like something Chris Cornell himself would not have wanted. Read the rest of this entry »

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At this time, there are no doubt scores of World War I articles and expositions being published right now. But I also want to talk about one of the more famous cultural homages to the First World War – the fourth and final series of the classic British series Blackadder; and in particular its famous final episode.

While Blackadder as a whole is rightly regarded as an absolute classic in British television comedy (despite a dreadful first season), it is probably its forth and final incarnation, Blackadder Goes Forth – the season set in the trenches of World War I – that is the most fondly regarded overall.

Airing on the BBC from 28th September to 2nd November 1989, the final series of Blackadder depicted life in a Flanders trench in World War I and centered primarily around Captain Blackadder’s failed schemes to escape the grim horrors of the front line. While the Elizabethan Blackadder II (who could forget Miranda Richardson’s singular take on the Virgin Queen?) and the Georgian-set Blackadder the Third (and who could forget Hugh Laurie’s exceptionally stupid Prince George?) are both equally as good in comedy terms, what marks out the final series of Blackadder is the grimness of its setting and the surprising level of poignancy it manages to attain at times, particularly in its final episode. Read the rest of this entry »