Posts Tagged ‘Corporatism’

The rise of Jair Bolsonaro in Brazil seems to be further proof that pretty much the entire planet is moving in a counter-clockwise direction.

Almost everywhere you look, there seems to be the sense that the Bad Guys are in the ascendancy: and that – far from opposing it – very large sections of populations are almost gleeful about welcoming that state of affairs.

I wrote at length here a few weeks ago about all of the madness, misinformation and *reality* of the ‘Migrant Caravan’ from Honduras to the US: and that’s going to be relevant again to this subject of what’s going on in Brazil.

We really have entered into an extraordinary age of mass manipulation, popular stupidity, blind folly and open conspiracy.

‘Corruption’ is a massive factor too, of course: but corruption is the oldest profession in the world, so we should always take that as a given. There’s always a big dose of cognitive dissonance going on when people talk about all the ‘corruption’ and the need to find a saviour to ‘fix’ all the terrible ‘corruption’ – that’s also one of the oldest tricks/archetypes in the book.

‘Corruption’ and dealing with all these ‘corrupt politicians’ is actually precisely the thing that paved the way to this state of affairs – which we’ll come to in a moment, as we’ll have to rewind the narrative back two years.

But what also keeps occuring to me is the sense that the Old Elites are playing an absolute blinder: casting themselves and their proxies as the heroes in the shifting equations, often manipulating even the working classes into championing them and generally getting people to mostly miss the forest for the trees. (more…)

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With Article 50 due to be triggered imminently, we might naturally ask ourselves again what it is that the ‘Brexit’ process is meant to lead us towards in the long-run.
‘Shock Doctrine’, Child Poverty, Ultra-Capitalism ‘On Steroids’ and the UK’s potential future as a corporate tax-haven are just part of the picture feared by some. And by the way, TTIP isn’t dead.

In assessing what the underlying motives for ‘Brexit’ might be, we will also need to look at it in the context of what is happening in the United States. And given the sheer amount of brainwashed misconception that appears to be proliferating in terms of both Brexit and Trump, we should also decode why it is that the trendy term “the liberal elite” is such a stroke of Machiavellian genius.

Irrespective of where you stand on Brexit or the EU – and I have always made it clear that I don’t have any loyalty to either camp, but am merely studying the information and trying to understand what is going on from as neutral a position as possible – it is always important to assess the motivations or intentions of whatever forces or alliances are controlling any given course of events. (more…)

PHOTOGRAPH BY JEWEL SAMAD / AFP / GETTY

 I recently spoke with Dr Leon Tressell, a historian of geopolitics and expert on the ‘bankster crime wave’. Instead of trying to summarise or repackage his material, I’ve decided – with his full permission – to fully reproduce the text of an article he recently published for SouthFront; it includes his interview with Helen Chaitman about the biggest recorded crime in Wall Street history, the role of JP Morgan in this, and what it tells us about the state of the American financial and political system.

The text below is all Leon Tressell’s writing, re-posted here with his permission. (more…)

donald-trump-30

Now that the electoral college has has confirmed Trump’s presidency and his inauguration approaches, I wanted to address the shape of the incoming Trump administration, the dangers, the sensibilities.

And why there is legitimate, palpable reason for concern and anxiety that isn’t anything to do with being ‘liberal elite’ or ‘lib-tard’ or whatever dumb labels anti-progressives like to throw around due to lack of vocabulary.

As these concerns are multifarious, I’ve decided to break them up into three different posts, starting with this one, to deal with three different areas: the second deals with the wacky or dangerous ‘basket of deplorables’ (to borrow a phrase) being brought into office around the Donald, and the third is focused on the foreign policy dangers. (more…)

occupy-movement

On 17th September 2011, Occupy Wall Street gained enormous worldwide media coverage. The people were revolting against the corporate control over society, against the criminal bankers and their vassal government officials, against injustice and inequality.
It felt like, and could’ve been, a defining moment of a generation; it could’ve been world-changing.

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poverty-uk

One of the moments I always remember most from Charles Dickens’ immortal seasonal story,  A Christmas Carol,  is the early passage where Ebeneezer Scrooge is visited by the charity collectors, who naively come to Scrooge for a donation to their ‘fund for the poor’.
True to character, the miserly Scrooge tells them that he doesn’t have time for ‘idle people’. “Are the work-houses still in operation?” he casually asks, implying that the poor, disabled and destitute  should be put to work. When he is confronted with the possibility of many of them dying, Scrooge simply says, “well, they’d best get on with it and decrease the surplus population…”

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election2015-nickclegg
“What just happened?” one devastated voter writes in a letter to The Independent, trying to come to terms with the 2015 General Election outcome. He concludes that was just happened was “Nothing short of an Establishment coup.”
That wouldn’t necessarily be an exaggeration. This is a very serious generational moment (of crisis) with major implications for society, for social cohesion, for common welfare and for the United Kingdom itself.
A forlorn Nick Clegg warned in his resignation speech on Friday morning, “The continued existence of our United Kingdom itself is now in grave jeopardy…”

(more…)

Election2015-fox
We in the UK now have major problems ahead. In some respects the fear-mongering may be excessive; in others, however, there is genuine cause for great concern about what this 2015 General Election outcome will mean for UK society and what the next five years will hold.

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Russell Brand, charismatic comedian and regular controversialist, isn’t new to causing a stir or to dividing opinion, as his recent appearance on BBC2’s Newsnight has managed to do.

However, he isn’t saying anything that hasn’t been said before nor is he saying anything that a very large number of people don’t also think or feel. The difference is that most people with those views will rarely if ever be afforded a mainstream platform like the BBC or Newsnight from which to air their views, and so it can be argued that it falls to ‘celebrities’ or artists like Russell Brand to use their positions to represent those views on behalf of those who aren’t afforded that kind of voice. (more…)