Posts Tagged ‘Darth Vader’

There is something that occurred to me ever since seeing The Force Awakens for the first time. It’s a theory based firmly in the mysticism and esoteric nature of the Star Wars mythology that has always been there.

And I want to lay it out here – before people go to see the new film.

As the next chapter in the Star Wars film saga sees general release, I’m taking a last chance to bore everyone with my juvenile fan-boy theorising and wide-eyed analysis: and, in this instance, to explain why I think there’s a hidden story in The Force Awakens and that it wasn’t entirely the film we thought it was.

For anyone who’s not particularly a Star Wars fan, I apologise – for what is going to read like a lot of rambling, geeky nonsense.

I’ve posted this theory elsewhere too; but I wanted to make sure I shared it here as well. I can’t say, of course, whether The Last Jedi will validate any of this or not. But you will need to rewatch The Force Awakens after reading through this – in order to test the argument out.

An alternate title for this could be ‘ANAKIN SKYWALKER WAS IN THE FORCE AWAKENS AND WE DIDN’T NOTICE’. (more…)



As psychological subjects for a comic-book go, they don’t come much richer than the Dark Lord of the Sith, Darth Vader… or the Artist Formerly Known as Anakin Skywalker.
Though there are any number of characters from the rich Star Wars tapestry that I love, it’s hard to argue against Vader always having been the most fascinating.


When I was a little kid, I remember I used to draw Darth Vader, Boba Fett and the Imperial Tie-Fighters compulsively.
Whenever I had a spare bit of paper or whenever my mind wandered, I would end up doodling variations of those images. I also drew (and coloured in) a few fanboy, speculative comic-book covers; one with Fett crawling out of the Sarlaac pit and another of the Ewok Wicket.


revenge of the sith 33

George Lucas’s final contribution to his epic Star Wars saga must rank as one of the most criminally underrated and most unfairly maligned films of all time. Rarely has true brilliance been so blindly dismissed.