Posts Tagged ‘Internet censorship’

This is an article about censorship – particularly, in this latest instance, involving (unfortunately) the very platform I am publishing on right now: and whether it will continue to be as safe or as accomodating a space for blogs like this one as it has been until now.

But first, I’m putting up this notification – because I suspect there’s a real chance this website/blog could get taken down at any time.

I’m creating a back-up blog of all of this site’s archived content. I’ll explain why in the article below. But should The Burning Blogger of Bedlam be swept up in a censorship purge that appears to be occurring, I will activate the other site and begin publishing my current/future articles over there, at least as a temporary solution to what is – presumably – going to be an ongoing problem.

So any readers, subscribers or friends who want to continue with me – or continue following my articles – will have to go that site and subscribe over there in the event of *this site* disappearing.

However, I can’t make that site ‘active’ yet – because it’ll create duplicated-content problems while this WordPress site is still running. So that site will not be going live until it becomes necessary (i.e: if or when this site goes down). (more…)

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z-delete-natasha

A recurring theme in news items and print journalism in recent years has been the issue of accountability of on-line commentators and the underlying question of whether it’s a good or bad thing that we now live in a world where everyone has the platform to express their uncensored views and act as social commentator.

Accompanying this are issues of regulating the internet, with legal action being taken more and more in recent months against, for example, people on Twitter. Issues of freedom of speech, etc, obviously crop up here too. At what point does an opinion become a ‘crime’? Should an opinion ever be thought of as a ‘crime’? And at what point does the ‘right to offend’ cross some kind of unacceptable boundary – and who defines what that boundary is?

(more…)