Posts Tagged ‘Islamic State’

In June 2014, a group of armed militants and extremists made their dramatic journey across the Syrian border into Iraq, quickly capturing Mosul and Baiji and almost reaching the capital Baghdad.

The group possessed convoys of identical Toyota trucks and the kind of arsenal some countries in the region would be envious of. The media was flooded with footage of drive-by shootings, large-scale death marches, mass executions and mass graves. Any Iraqi soldier captured was executed.

That incursion of the Islamic State (IS) brigades into Iraq was part of a planned military-intelligence operation supported covertly by various states.

The jihadists at some point appropriated entire truckloads of American humvees; they acquired helicopters, tanks, and artillery. They photographed and filmed themselves, openly broadcasting what they were doing all over social media. In spite of this, no attempt was made by the US or anyone else to stop them – not until after the group had already taken over entire cities or towns and begun its bloody crusade. (more…)

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This is a follow-up, I guess, to the article I last published here on the Shamima Begum or ‘ISIS bride’ media storm: but asking some follow-up questions and raising some related issues.

In that other article, I asked about why the teenage girl’s situation was being so blown up in the media, while other individuals – including ISIS fighters – had been allowed to return to the UK without any media scrutiny.

I also questioned the role of British intelligence in the exodus of these various kids to Syria in the first place, the role of someone like Anjem Choudary in that same context, and whether Shamima Begum was simply being made a media scapegoat in order to deflect focus from the real ‘controversies’, conspiracies and questions. (more…)

It’s been difficult to ignore or avoid the massive coverage, controversy and debate surrounding the ‘ISIS bride’ Shamima Begum that has dominated British news in the passed week or so.

The massively inflated ‘scandal’ has created differences in opinion over what should be done with her, whether her citizenship should be revoked, whether she should be allowed back into the UK, etc.

I personally have no interest in Shamima Begum: basically a dumb girl who drank the Islamic State Kool-Aid, went to start a new life in the Wild West, and now wants to come home because the ‘adventure’ has crumbled to dust.

However, the entire ‘controversy’ over what to do with British kids who went over to Syria or Iraq to live in (or fight for) the ‘caliphate’ seems to me to be a massive distraction strategy: it’s aim being to get everyone fired up over highly divisive idiots and their dumb decisions or their radicalisation… while completely failing to register the role of the government and the state in the entire misbegotten saga.

In effect, all of the focus and debate is over a nineteen year-old girl who made a shitty decision when she was 15: so that none of the focus or debate is on more important aspects of the equation that she became a tiny part of. (more…)

Amid all the recent provocation and manuevering concerning Russia, Ukraine and the Azov Sea (see here and here), another story may have passed under a lot of peoples’ radars: concerning not the Azov Sea, but Ukraine’s Neo-Nazi ‘Azov Batallion’.

It’s arguably not a huge story in itself: and I’ll get to it in a moment.

But I want to explore how I think this story relates to so much else of what I’ve been talking about here for a few years now: including the war on Russia, the Islamists and the destablisation of the Middle East, the projected ‘race wars’ or societal breakdown, the rise of the Far-Right and white supremacists, and the possible or probable fascist conspiracy manuevering behind all of this.

You often find, when you’ve been keeping tabs on various different situations or themes for a few years, that they tend to come together and inter-relate more often than you’d think – indicating that even things that appear to be unconnected on the surface actually weave together as part of a dangerous web.

This would be either by deliberate design or by unforeseen consequences and the dominoe effect. (more…)

Admittedly, I am guilty of mixing a couple of apparently unrelated subjects here: but, as you’ll see, there’s probably good reason for doing so.

There’s a big debate currently going on in the UK.

The big debate is over two brutal jihadists – Alexanda Kotey and El Shafee Elsheikh – and their extradition to the United States: or, at least, their being allowed to be taken from Syria to the United States.

The two of them were part of the high-profile “Beatles” cell of British ISIS fighters who participated in the brutal execution of high-profile foreign victims at the height of the ISIS psy-op and ‘caliphate’ – which, bear in mind, was created in Iraq and Syria as a result of US-led geo-political activity in Iraq, Syria and Libya.

To non-UK-based people reading this, the issue is that the UK – until this announcement – was understood to hold a firm moral position against the death penalty: and against cooperating in the extradition of anyone who is liable to be facing execution.

Shami Chakribati framed the Home Office’s decision in these terms, saying that Sajid Javed had ‘secretly and unilaterally abandoned Britain’s opposition to the death penalty‘ – a position that had previously negated the extradition of anyone expected to face execution in another country. (more…)

I’ve been pondering this for some time; and have tried to somewhat lay out the subject as best as I can here in this article.

This is something of a thought-experiment; trying to track the various strands of consequences from a single event, but moreover, trying to understand why that event has everything to do with where we are now – and on multiple levels – in this first decade-and-a-half of the twenty-first century.

With all the bad things and negative situations going on in the world today, why have things come to this? How could most of this stuff – in the Middle East, in Europe, even in the US – have been avoided?

Could it have been avoided? (more…)

Widely published ‘reports’ in the last week or so claimed that the so-called ‘Islamic State’ group’s elusive ‘caliph’, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, had been killed in a Russian airstrike in Raqqa.

In fact, the reports are now that this story was false – which makes me wonder why it was doing the rounds at all. Baghdadi has in fact been declared ‘killed’ a number of times in the last couple of years. I’ve never believed those claims – because I’ve never been properly convinced that ‘Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi’ exists at all.

In covering this subject of Baghdadi here, I’m going to revisit some of what I’ve written here before – specifically regarding the Baghdadi mystery, but also the older Bin Laden myth (as I believe the two are related), and the whole business of this ‘caliphate’ that the ‘ISIS/Daesh’ group has been trying to carve out in the Middle East. (more…)

cia-torture-gitmo-opendemocracy-net

Torture exists. It goes on in the world. We all know that.
30 years after the UN Convention Against Torture established measures to eradicate the practice, it is in fact still going on in at least 141 countries; including countries that are signatories to the UN convention, according to Amnesty International’s  annual report (the one I’m quoting is from 2014).

The 1948 Universal Declaration on Human Rights is unambiguous: “No one shall be subjected to torture or to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.”

That ruling, as well as the Geneva Conventions and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, dictates an absolute ban on torture for any purpose; note that there’s no special allowance for ‘times of war’ or ‘urgent matters of national security’ or any other excuse any governments or agencies might offer for their illegal actions. (more…)

syria-airstrikes

You might’ve thought that the United States‘ policy in Syria couldn’t get any more confused or damaged: but the admission that a US air strike has killed somewhere between 60 to 83 soldiers of the Syrian Army is just about the worst thing, and at the worst time, that could’ve happened in terms of US credibility. (more…)