Posts Tagged ‘Muammar Gaddafi’

The Lockerbie bombing in 1988 was perhaps the 9/11 of its time.
While it didn’t result in the kind of phony Global ‘War on Terror’ that was conducted after 9/11, it did give the US and Britain the platform for beginning a targeted downfall of a particular nation and society, this being Libya.

This was accomplished the same way in Libya as it was accomplished in Iraq: first by years and years of crippling sanctions and forced hardship (via the UN),then by all-out destruction against a nation that is no longer able to defend itself (Iraq in 2003, Libya in 2011).

There are essentially two ways to look at Lockerbie.

One, the most important, is as a criminal investigation of an act of mass murder. The other is as a prolonged political or geo-political tool serving multiple purposes. Both are worth revisiting; particularly as the ghost of Lockerbie (and all of its victims) has reappeared in news media in the last few weeks.

Revisiting the subject of Lockerbie is important both as a study of geo-politics and the place of political terrorism within that arena and as a study in history and how it relates to contemporary events.

I want to take a broad overview of the Lockerbie subject here, touching on all of those areas: this article will cover (1) the reasons why the ‘official’ story of Lockerbie is so problematic and disputed, (2) the release of the ‘Lockerbie Bomber’ from prison in Scotland and why it happened, (3) the political and geopolitical motives and consequences of the Lockerbie trial and verdict, and finally (4) the many different theories as to who really did carry out the Lockerbie bombing and why. (more…)

There is something very, very important to understand about the terrorist attack in Manchester on Monday night.
And it is something that virtually all mainstream media outlets have failed to – or will continue to deliberately avoid – talking about. Because they don’t want their average audiences – and the general public – to have any sense of context, perspective or history.

At this time when people are very emotional, when there are armed soldiers being deployed into public places, and when mainstream radio super-bitches (someone called Katie Hopkins) literally called for “a final solution” to the ‘Muslim problem’, it is hugely important to have a true perspective about what happened in Manchester.

The game right now is to have us all in fixed paradigms and tensions that are binary and emotional. Part of that controlled perspective is to divorce current events from their real context and to divorce cause and effect from each other.

They don’t want you thinking critically or logically – but to instead be stuck in the vicious cycle of anxiety, insecurity, and anger.

There is a mainstream context to all of this: which, basically, centers on the problem of radicalisation and an extreme version of Islam.

And then there’s a different context to all of this – which I will try to comprehensively lay out in this article in a way that makes things very clear. (more…)

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He walked up to the podium to address the UN General Assembly.
All eyes in the chamber were on the strange, eccentric figure, whose invitation to New York had been the subject of great controversy and coverage. Staring out at all the delegations of world government, he acted out ripping up the UN Charter, calling it “worthless”.

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It is difficult to look at the situation in Aleppo and not see it in a broader context. Not only of Syria, but of Libya, the past several years, and of the entire region. And of international affairs in general.

We probably shouldn’t; we should probably view different situations entirely in their own light. But I can’t help but look at Aleppo – both the fall of Aleppo to rebel militias and foreign-backed mercenaries and now the liberation or reclamation of Aleppo by Syrian government forces – and see it as a point on a timeline that goes all the way back to Benghazi, Tripoli, Sirte and elsewhere. (more…)

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As a few days ago marked the fifth anniversary of the murder of Muammar Gaddafi, I decided to mark it with a more low-key, fun-ish look back at Libya’s former national figurehead.

A more serious piece on the life and character of one of the most controversial world figures of the 20th century will follow in a few days, which I’d been working on for some time but hadn’t been able to finish in time. (more…)

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If anyone’s getting bored of me talking about the Libya intervention in 2011, I apologise – and I probably won’t do it again after this.

But I just need to clear something up once and for all; because people keep arguing with me about this. (more…)

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Following in the wake of the Chilcot Report into the Iraq War, British MPs have issued a substantial condemnation of David Cameron and Britain’s key role in the collapse of Libya.

It comes far too late; but it is nevertheless a significant moment and acknowledgement of the utter disaster that Britain played a substantial role in, even if France was the primary driver (of what I have called and will continue to call ‘the crime of the century’). (more…)

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On October 19th 2011, a convoy of cars left the city of Sirte, carrying Libya’s beleaguered figurehead Muammar Gaddafi.
On October 21st, an American/CIA drone (being operated from Las Vegas) spots the convoy and alerts NATO bombers, which immediately begin bombing the vehicles.

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The recent bombing of select ISIL positions in the former nation once known as Libya may be a precursor to a much larger operation.

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