Posts Tagged ‘Terrorism’

The Lockerbie bombing in 1988 was perhaps the 9/11 of its time: and today marks 30 years since it happened.
While it didn’t result in the kind of phony Global ‘War on Terror’ that was conducted after 9/11, it did give the US and Britain the platform for beginning a targeted downfall of a particular nation and society, this being Libya.

This was accomplished the same way in Libya as it was accomplished in Iraq: first by years and years of crippling sanctions and forced hardship (via the UN),then by all-out destruction against a nation that is no longer able to defend itself (Iraq in 2003, Libya in 2011).

There are essentially two ways to look at Lockerbie.

One, the most important, is as a criminal investigation of an act of mass murder. The other is as a prolonged political or geo-political tool serving multiple purposes. Both are worth revisiting; particularly as the ghost of Lockerbie (and all of its victims) has reappeared in news media in the last few weeks.

Revisiting the subject of Lockerbie is important both as a study of geo-politics and the place of political terrorism within that arena and as a study in history and how it relates to contemporary events.

I want to take a broad overview of the Lockerbie subject here, touching on all of those areas: this article will cover (1) the reasons why the ‘official’ story of Lockerbie is so problematic and disputed, (2) the release of the ‘Lockerbie Bomber’ from prison in Scotland and why it happened, (3) the political and geopolitical motives and consequences of the Lockerbie trial and verdict, and finally (4) the many different theories as to who really did carry out the Lockerbie bombing and why. (more…)

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So the shooting/attack in Strasborg at the Christmas Market.

It doesn’t really need much thinking to go into this, but I’m giving it a go partly for Mark from Truthscoop: because he pointed out that hardly anyone appears to have spoken about this particular ‘act of terror’ in any sceptical terms.

He’s right: but I’ve noted this before too (in regard to the Westminster ‘attack’ a few months ago, which seemed to barely register a blip in the news cycle or even in online alt-media and which most of us have completely forgotten about) – people who used to be all over this stuff a few years ago no longer seem to care.

I suspect this is partly because a lot of those people have shifted their interest from Objective Observation to instead joining in the divide-and-conquer programme itself, taking their lead from the mass hijacking of ‘alternative media’ that calls itself the ‘alt right’. For them, supposed Islamist-related terror attacks are best left unrefuted – because it serves the interests of the Alt-Right brainwashing programme and the divide-and-conquer psy-op.

That’s why – at the higher end of that equation – people like Alex Jones and Paul Joseph Watson no longer acknowledge the existence of false-flag operations: and this is why a majority of self-styled ‘truther’ bloggers or video-makers also do the same, because they take their lead from the big ‘influencers’ in the hijacked ‘alternative media. (more…)

I used to try to cover terror incidents or suspected false-flag ops in detail: I have an archive of articles devoted solely to the various terror incidents across the West in the last several years.

But I eventually got so bored of the subject, because it got to the point where it almost didn’t matter anymore whether any given attack was a genuine terror attack, a false-flag or a case of state-enabled terrorism.

So, as for this latest car attack in Westminster… meh.

Whatever.

Could’ve been real or could’ve been staged. Does anyone care anymore? Everyone’s response is going to be predetermined anyway: those who believe in the false-flag ops will believe it’s a false-flag, while those who don’t will believe it was a real terror attack – and therefore any drawn-out efforts at detailed analysis or research become purely academic and a waste of time and energy, since the majority of people are stuck firmly in the realm of memes, hashtags and/or confirmation bias. (more…)

Admittedly, I am guilty of mixing a couple of apparently unrelated subjects here: but, as you’ll see, there’s probably good reason for doing so.

There’s a big debate currently going on in the UK.

The big debate is over two brutal jihadists – Alexanda Kotey and El Shafee Elsheikh – and their extradition to the United States: or, at least, their being allowed to be taken from Syria to the United States.

The two of them were part of the high-profile “Beatles” cell of British ISIS fighters who participated in the brutal execution of high-profile foreign victims at the height of the ISIS psy-op and ‘caliphate’ – which, bear in mind, was created in Iraq and Syria as a result of US-led geo-political activity in Iraq, Syria and Libya.

To non-UK-based people reading this, the issue is that the UK – until this announcement – was understood to hold a firm moral position against the death penalty: and against cooperating in the extradition of anyone who is liable to be facing execution.

Shami Chakribati framed the Home Office’s decision in these terms, saying that Sajid Javed had ‘secretly and unilaterally abandoned Britain’s opposition to the death penalty‘ – a position that had previously negated the extradition of anyone expected to face execution in another country. (more…)

So, a few quick notes on the apparent terror attack/incident in New York.

As usual, this entirely could’ve been a straight-up ISIS-inspired, low-tech, ‘lone wolf’ attack.

And, as usual, maybe not. (more…)

The mass shooting in Las Vegas has prompted all the usual responses from all the usual (tedious) voices.

From mainstream calls for tighter gun regulations to alt-right insistance that this must’ve been Muslims (or militant ‘liberals’) conducting a false-flag – it is clear, as it has been for some time now, that 90% of what passes for public discourse these days consists of echo chambers, confirmation bias and a kind of inane, broken record syndrome.

That being said, the available information (so far) about this attack paints a shaky, confusing picture of events.

There is also something very interesting about the location – which I will get to at the end; and which is the reason I raise the question of whether there’s a ritual element to this massacre. (more…)

In a 2015 article concerning this deployment of troops in France, I wrote of the thousands of armed soldiers that were about to be deployed into the streets as a move that bears a striking resemblance to the beginnings of Martial Law in Europe…’

I also said in the same post that London would probably follow.

I actually don’t want to bother talking about the Parsons Green incident itself – but to explore a broader question about the response to it; and about the idea of armed soldiers being out in public to protect us from terror threats.

We can mostly skip the usual repetoire concerning the ‘terror incident or false flag?’ question (analysing footage, lack of CCTV, speculation on ‘crisis actors’, etc) and leave that to others.

A crude explosive device was apparently to blame for the tube incident in Parsons Green (though, from photos, it appears not to have damaged the bucket or container it was in), with around two dozen or so people reportedly injured and needing hospitalisation.

Quite possibly this IED was placed by a terrorist, ISIS sympathiser or lone wolf. And possibly it wasn’t. (more…)

The YouTube video I embedded into the post yesterday on the London Bridge attack CCTV footage no longer exists – the video was obviously taken down some time before or after I posted the article.

The footage I was trying to link to, as I explained in the previous post, showed a different, longer version of the CCTV footage to the version that was shown on mainstream outlets and most YouTube channels.

The version that most channels/websites are showing is a shortened version, which omits the following segment that I alluded to yesterday. (more…)

A quick post here on the Finsbury Park attack – because what I actually want to talk about more is the so-called ‘race war’ meme or the widespread predictions/fears of a ‘civil war’ type scenario on the streets of England, as well as France, the US and elsewhere.

That, however, is such a big, important and complex subject, that I just want to talk quickly and solely about Finsbury Park first – and I will publish that bigger, broader article tomorrow.

As with the June 3rd attack in London Bridge, I was listening to a couple of hours of live radio as the story was breaking. As I have a habit of leaving the radio on when I’m trying to fall asleep, I happened to hear a number of live eyewitness callers from Finsbury Park – and it is clear that this was a real incident, just as London Bridge was probably a real incident. (more…)